WHY NEWFOUNDLAND

LNG?

Why Does the World Need LNG?
Is There a Greener LNG?
Why Newfoundland LNG?

LNG NL is primarily focused is on permitting and developing the stranded gas in existing offshore fields, specifically in the Jeanne d’ Arc Basin area 340 km southeast of St John’s. The initial plan is to produce at a capacity of 2.5 Million Tonnes per Annum (MTPA); the energy equivalent of heating 1.5 million Canadian homes or supplying approximately 5% of Germany’s current LNG demand.

The associated infrastructure will be designed to accommodate future expansion to 4.0 MTPA.

Project Background

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Since 1997 Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada has seen significant offshore oil production. To date 3.9 billion barrels of oil and approximately 12 TCF of natural gas, including 340 MMBLs of condensate have been discovered. In addition to these discovered resources, the region has an active exploration cycle in a basin area approximately 1.5 time the size of the Gulf of Mexico basin area.

What does 350-400 MMSCFD / 2.5 MTPA of LNG Equate to?

  • Energy equivalent of 21 million bbls of crude oil per year

  • 5,000 MW of electrical power

  • Energy for 1.5 million average Canadian homes

  • 8 million tonnes less carbon dioxide than burning coal

  • 8 million less tonnes of carbon dioxide ~taking 1.7 million cars off the road

  • ~ 5% of natural gas demand in Germany

  • ~ 0.7% of current world LNG production capacity

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Location of offshore gas fields and proposed 600 km pipeline connecting to Grassy Point, Placentia Bay

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Project Summary

First Phase Development of the LNG NL project will involve construction a 600 km pipeline to bring the gas directly from existing offshore production platforms to Grassy Point, Placentia Bay on the south coast of NL. Gas from the offshore platforms will be routed to the pipeline through subsea tie-back infrastructure.

None of ~8 TCF of discovered natural gas resource in the Jeanne d’ Arc Basin offshore NL has been produced for export.
Advance 2030, Newfoundland and Labrador’s natural gas development strategy, aims for commercial production of natural gas by 2030.

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Grassy Point

Location of Grassy Point site and neighbouring infrastructure.

Located at Latitude - 47°45'16.59"N and Longitude - 54°1'20.82"W, the proposed Grassy Point site is 135 km west northwest of St. John’s, NL via the Trans-Canada Highway.

 

More importantly, the 175-hectare (432-acre) site has excellent access to deep water. As Placentia Bay is ice-free and home to a renewable fuels refinery and an oil transshipment terminal, there are well established navigational routes for tankers and many environmental safety and response protocols already in place.

At Grassy Point, which was previously permitted for an LNG transshipment development, LNG NL will construct an Export Terminal consisting of an onshore pre-processing facility and a Floating Liquified Natural Gas (FLNG) Vessel moored onsite for liquefaction and storage of the clean gas prior to loading it on specialized tankers for transport to market.

Proposed onshore processing and floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) plant at Grassy Point

Phase 1 infrastructure will operate to an initial LNG production capacity of 2.5 Million Tonnes per year (MTPA) but designed to accommodate future expansion to 4.0 MTPA as demand dictates.

Because Grassy Point is just over half the distance to the EU as compared to the LNG facilities in the Gulf of Mexico and because the gas will be produced using 100% renewable hydroelectric energy, LNG NL anticipates significant competitive advantage in a sophisticated market increasingly concerned about their carbon footprint and, now more than ever, concerned about diversification of supply.

LNG NL’s strategic location offers the shortest and most direct route from North America to high demand EU markets.

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Technical Feasibility

The technology required to advance this project is proven. Longer pipelines have already been constructed in more extreme marine environments. In 25 years, weather and ice conditions offshore NL have not significantly hampered oil production.

 

Initial assessments indicate that any technical challenges associated with construction of a pipeline to bring gas from the Jeanne d’ Arc Basin to Placentia Bay can be fully addressed. LNG NL has partnered with C-CORE, a world class research institute specializing in northern climate risk assessment, including pipeline risk assessment. C-CORE, together with widely recognized pipeline design and installation experts in the EPCM, maritime registrar and classification societies, will ensure the pipeline is designed and built to the most stringent international safety and environmental standards.

LNG NL Project Overview

REOI LNG NL

Grassy Point

Located at Latitude - 47°45'16.59"N and Longitude - 54°1'20.82"W, the proposed Grassy Point site is 135 km WNW of St. John’s, NL via the Trans-Canada Highway.

 

More importantly, the 175-hectare (432-acre) site has excellent access to deep water. As Placentia Bay is ice-free and home to a renewable fuels refinery and an oil transshipments terminal, there are well established navigational routes for tankers and many environmental safety and response protocols already in place.

LNG Maps_3.jpg

At Grassy Point, which was previously permitted for an LNG transshipment development, LNG NL will construct a US$2.5 billion Export Terminal consisting of an onshore pre-processing facility and a Floating Liquified Natural Gas (FLNG) Vessel moored onsite for liquefaction and storage of the clean gas prior to loading it on specialized tankers for transport to market.

Location of Grassy Point site and neighbouring infrastructure.

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Proposed onshore processing and floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) plant at Grassy Point